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Six Sigma Green Belt Certification (SSGB)

Skillsoft presents Six Sigma Green Belt Certification (SSGB).

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₹16,806.56

Six Sigma Green Belt Certification (SSGB)

₹16,806.56

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Over 42 Hours
Certification Course

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Course Features

Learn on Your Own
Over 42 Hours
Certification Course

Don't have time?

We can send you everything you need to know about this course through email.

We respect your privacy. Your information is safe and will never be shared.

Course Description

Skillsoft is your trusted global provider of high-quality, innovative, cloud-based learning with all aspects of e-learning covered including Business Skills and Leadership, IT Skills and Certification, Digital Skills and Compliance. Skillsoft engages learners with interactive courses, enlightening videos and practical simulations, allowing for learning in the modality that works best for them.

 

The following courses are included in this purchase:

  • Mentoring Asset
  • Test Preps
  • Courses

Access Timeframe
6 month access to course content beginning on date of registration.
Type of Certification
Certification of Completion
Format of Certification
Digital and Print
Method of Obtaining Certification
Certificate of Completion can be accessed and printed from the learner's Skillport Account.
Additional Details
The completion certificates can be awarded only for assets that can be marked completed like courses, business impact/challenge series, testprep. The passive assets like books/videos would not be completed and certificates cannot be awarded.

Course Outline

OVERVIEW
Skillsoft Mentors are available to help students with their studies for the Six Sigma Green Belt (SSGB) exam. You can reach them by entering a Mentored Chat Room or by using the Email My Mentor service.

* This asset is aligned to the SSGB 2014 body of knowledge.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Individuals who are studying the associated Skillsoft content in preparation for, or to become familiar with, the skills and competencies being measured by the actual certification exam.
DURATION
0.0 hours
OBJECTIVES

Mentoring Six Sigma Green Belt (SSGB)

  • Overview: Six Sigma and the Organization
  • Define Phase
  • Measure Phase
  • Analyze Phase
  • Improve Phase
  • Control Phase


OVERVIEW
To test your knowledge on the skills and competencies being measured by the vendor certification exam. TestPrep can be taken in either Study or Certification mode. Study mode is designed to maximize learning by not only testing your knowledge of the material, but also by providing additional information on the topics presented. Certification mode is designed to test your knowledge of the material within a structured testing environment, providing valuable feedback at the end of the test.

* This TestPrep is aligned to the SSGB 2014 body of knowledge.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Individuals seeking practice in a structured testing environment, covering the skills and competencies being measured by the vendor certification exam.
DURATION
4.0 hours
OBJECTIVES

TestPrep Six Sigma Green Belt (SSGB)

  • Not Available


OVERVIEW
Six Sigma is a data-driven improvement program that focuses on process, product, and service quality and aims to reduce defects, variation, and costs. Six Sigma uses a rigorous and systematic methodology known as DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control) and a number of qualitative and quantitative tools for achieving profitability, customer satisfaction, and quality-related organizational goals. |n This course will examine how Six Sigma helps organizations achieve their strategic goals. It introduces the key Six Sigma concepts and then moves on to discuss how they help achieve organizational goals by connecting business drivers to Six Sigma metrics and scorecards. This course is aligned with the ASQ Body of Knowledge and designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward their certification and to help them become productive members of their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.9 hours
OBJECTIVES

Six Sigma and Organizational Goals

  • recognize the benefits of implementing Six Sigma in an organization
  • identify the key characteristics of Six Sigma
  • recognize how the transfer function is applied in Six Sigma
  • demonstrate your understanding of fundamental Six Sigma concepts
  • sequence key developments in the evolution of continuous improvement methodologies
  • recognize the impact of continuous improvement methodologies on the evolution of Six Sigma
  • match the pioneers of Six Sigma to their key contributions
  • recognize events and figures that influenced the evolution of Six Sigma
  • identify questions that need to be asked while assessing an organization's readiness for a Six Sigma project
  • recognize the considerations for selecting a project for Six Sigma
  • identify actions a Six Sigma team should take to establish linkages and supports with the organization's goals
  • recognize factors to consider when initiating and implementing a Six Sigma project
  • recognize the components of a business process in an example
  • classify a business process as a core process or a support process
  • recognize relationships between business processes
  • perform various aspects of the tasks involved in analyzing a business process
  • recognize examples of key business drivers
  • recognize the relationship between business drivers and Six Sigma
  • match examples of Six Sigma metrics to the type of metric each represents
  • identify characteristics of good metrics
  • match organizational perspectives to examples of their associated balanced scorecard metrics
  • recognize how metrics are used to improve processes


OVERVIEW
Lean is a continuous improvement initiative that streamlines processes and improves overall performance by reducing waste and cycle time. On improvement projects, Six Sigma can provide the underlying DMAIC methodology and tools to reduce variation and defects, whereas Lean tools and techniques can be specifically useful at the Improve and Control stages of DMAIC. This course introduces key Lean concepts and principles used on improvement projects in both service and manufacturing organizations. The course first examines the relationship between Lean and Six Sigma and introduces a few common Lean tools and techniques. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward achieving their certifications and becoming productive members of their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
2.2 hours
OBJECTIVES

Lean Principles and Six Sigma Projects

  • identify the stages of the Lean deployment methodology
  • identify differences and similarities between the Lean and Six Sigma methodologies
  • match Lean tools with the Six Sigma stages they can be generally applied to
  • recognize how Lean and Six Sigma concepts fit together
  • match Lean laws to their descriptions
  • match Lean concepts to their descriptions
  • recognize the steps in the Lean process
  • recognize concepts foundational to the Lean methodology
  • match Lean tools to their descriptions
  • identify characteristics unique to service organizations
  • recognize examples of organizational objectives, improvement goals, and tools appropriate for Lean Six Sigma projects in a manufacturing environment
  • recognize how Lean tools are used in manufacturing and service organizations
  • recognize key concepts associated with the theory of constraints
  • match various measures of a system in TOC to their descriptions and formulas
  • recognize how productivity is measured in Lean Six Sigma
  • determine whether a given activity should be considered value-added, nonvalue-added, or necessary nonvalue-added
  • recognize examples of different types of waste in an organization
  • identify examples of waste
  • identify the types of information revealed by a value stream map
  • match icons used in current state map to their descriptions
  • recognize icons used in creating the future state map
  • interpret a given value stream map


OVERVIEW
Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) is an innovative approach for the design or redesign of a process, product, or service from the ground up. It follows a 'pay me now or pay me later' adage by spending effort and time on creating a Six Sigma level process or product design up front, avoiding efforts to fix them later. Tools such as failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) are extensively used to achieve DFSS goals. FMEA helps identify possible failures and their potential impact on a design, manufacturing assembly process, or product or service and prioritize actions to address them. This course will examine how Six Sigma combines DFSS and tools such as FMEA to reach its organizational goals. It introduces key DFSS and FMEA methodologies and concepts, distinguishes DFSS methodologies from Six Sigma DMAIC, and explains how to prioritize process and design risks using FMEA. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward their certifications and becoming productive members of their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and Champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.7 hours
OBJECTIVES

Design for Six Sigma and FMEA

  • match DFSS tools to their descriptions
  • determine whether to use DFSS for a given project
  • identify the similarities between DFSS and Six Sigma
  • demonstrate understanding of what DFSS is and when it's best used
  • match stages in the IDOV methodology with corresponding activities
  • match stages in the DMADV methodology with corresponding activities
  • label characteristics as belonging to either DMAIC, DMADV, or IDOV
  • distinguish between DMAIC, IDOV, and DMADV in terms of characteristics and uses
  • identify characteristics of FMEA
  • match types of FMEA with corresponding descriptions
  • recognize steps in the FMEA process
  • demonstrate your understanding of FMEA
  • assign severity, occurrence, and detection ratings to a given failure mode
  • calculate the percentage reduction in RPN
  • complete and analyze an FMEA worksheet
  • distinguish between design and process FMEA
  • interpret information found in a given FMEA worksheet
  • complete and analyze an FMEA worksheet


OVERVIEW
Six Sigma deployments demand major investments of time, effort, and money on behalf of an organization. Six Sigma teams responsible for these deployments need to exercise due diligence to identify and select the right project opportunities and appropriate Six Sigma methodology for the chosen project. Having done that, Six Sigma teams need to define various elements of the process of interest and other important aspects related to it such as process stakeholders and input and output variables. |n This course covers key considerations around the selection of projects and the methodology to apply to the selected project. It covers process elements, project benchmarking and the process inputs and outputs as well as the roles of various project stakeholders on the selected projects. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates in achieving their certification and becoming productive members of their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.6 hours
OBJECTIVES

Six Sigma Project Identification

  • match problem-solving approaches to corresponding descriptions
  • identify the questions that should be asked during a Six Sigma readiness assessment
  • calculate the priority score for a given project
  • select the best Six Sigma methodology for a given project
  • make Six Sigma project and methodology selections, given a scenario
  • identify expected outcomes of benchmarking
  • distinguish realities about benchmarking from misconceptions
  • match types of benchmarking with corresponding characteristics
  • demonstrate your understanding of benchmarking as it is used in Six Sigma
  • recognize the components of a given process
  • recognize the cause of a given problem on a cross-functional process improvement team
  • recognize the challenges that may arise for a given cross-functional process
  • recognize the importance of understanding process variables when conducting a Six Sigma project
  • label process variables according to where they belong in a SIPOC diagram
  • evaluate the input and output variables for a given process
  • recognize the importance of stakeholder management to the success of a project
  • identify the process owner on a given Six Sigma project
  • identify the process owners and stakeholders on a given project


OVERVIEW
A high-quality process that follows Six Sigma standards will create and deliver goods and services that meet and exceed customer requirements and expectations, This requires you to collect the Voice of the Customer (VOC) and translate that to product features, performance measures, or opportunities for improvement. You need a seamless process of identifying customers, collecting customer data, identifying customer requirements, and finally translating requirements into measures that are easy to understand and follow for employees who are responsible for processes, products, and services in the organization.   In this course, you will learn the differences between internal and external customers and examine concepts and tools for collecting and analyzing customer information and feedback and eliminating data biases. The course also explains how customer requirements are translated into deliverable goals using tools such as the Quality Function Deployment (QFD) and the House of Quality matrix. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward achieving their certifications and becoming productive members of their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
2.1 hours
OBJECTIVES

Voice of the Customer in Six Sigma

  • identify the considerations associated with the Voice of the Customer (VOC) and the Voice of the Business (VOB) when determining project requirements
  • sequence the five key steps for implementing a VOC strategy in a Six Sigma project
  • identify the internal and external customers in a given situation
  • identify potential effects of projects on customers
  • identify the internal and external customers of a project and the potential effect the project will have on them if the requirements are met or exceeded
  • recognize key concepts related to the importance of customer data in a Six Sigma project
  • identify the best data collection method to gather data for a given scenario
  • determine the most appropriate data collection tool to use for a given situation
  • identify the definitions of validity, reliability, and margin of error as they apply to data collection
  • identify descriptions of the types of data and bias errors that may be introduced into data collection efforts
  • match poor data collection practices with the type of issue they represent
  • take steps to ensure the reliability and validity of customer data collected for a project
  • classify examples of the types of customer requirements
  • match three levels of customer needs with their descriptions
  • sequence the phases of QFD
  • identify key concepts related to translating customer requirements into product features, performance measures, or opportunities for improvement for a Six Sigma project
  • identify statements that describe what an HOQ matrix is and how it translates the Voice of the Customer into requirements
  • identify statements that describe how the customer focus is documented in an HOQ diagram
  • match each section of the technical focus area of the HOQ with a description of the type of information it contains
  • match each area of an HOQ matrix with the description of the type of information it contains
  • sequence the steps involved in creating an HOQ matrix
  • prioritize customer requirements in an HOQ matrix
  • interpret the patterns in an interrelationship matrix for a given HOQ
  • interpret the customer and technical requirements in a given HOQ matrix
  • prioritize and rank various types of technical data in a given HOQ matrix
  • prioritize and rank various types of technical data in a given HOQ matrix
  • interpret technical correlations and targets on a given HOQ matrix
  • recognize how an HOQ is used to set technical targets
  • interpret the data on an HOQ matrix


OVERVIEW
Effective management of a Six Sigma project is critical to delivering expected organizational results. It requires a disciplined approach to managing schedules, costs, and deliverables. This course will examine the basic project management tools used in a successful Six Sigma project. You will learn how to create a project charter and how project scope and metrics are developed, and gain insight into the tools used to plan and implement a Six Sigma improvement initiative. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward achieving their certifications and becoming productive members of their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.9 hours
OBJECTIVES

Basics of Six Sigma Project Management

  • recognize examples of the elements of a project charter
  • recognize a well-written problem statement
  • recognize a well-written project charter
  • identify the purpose of establishing a well-defined project scope
  • identify best practices when scoping a Six Sigma project
  • identify characteristics of a given process by interpreting its process map
  • sequence the steps for creating a Pareto chart
  • determine the scope for a Six Sigma project using scoping tools
  • classify examples of metrics as either primary or secondary
  • determine the metrics for a Six Sigma project
  • identify how planning tools are used during a Six Sigma project
  • interpret a given Gantt chart
  • identify the critical path for a given activity network diagram
  • use the PERT formula to calculate expected time
  • use planning tools to gather project information and determine durations
  • identify the characteristics of key documentation categories
  • recognize the requirements for documenting a Six Sigma project
  • identify key activities associated with risk analysis
  • assign a priority score based on probability and impact to a given risk
  • identify the activities associated with project closure
  • perform activities related to project risk analysis and closure


OVERVIEW
In the early stages of a Six Sigma project, a set of management and planning tools are used to analyze and understand the quality and improvement issues at hand. Once this is done, the team measures current processes, analyzes them, and finds improvement solutions. In this course, you will learn about several management and planning tools that are used on Six Sigma projects. You will also be presented with some real-life examples of situations where these tools are best suited. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward achieving their certification and becoming productive members of their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.7 hours
OBJECTIVES

Six Sigma Management and Planning Tools

  • identify situations for which affinity diagrams are used when planning Six Sigma projects
  • recognize best practices when creating affinity diagrams
  • assess a given affinity diagramming session
  • identify uses for interrelationship digraphs
  • recognize best practices when creating interrelationship digraphs
  • interpret a given interrelationship digraph
  • identify uses for tree diagrams
  • recognize best practices when creating tree diagrams
  • interpret a given tree diagram
  • identify uses for prioritization matrices
  • recognize the steps for creating a prioritization matrix
  • interpret a given prioritization matrix
  • identify uses for matrix diagrams
  • recognize the steps for creating a matrix diagram
  • interpret a given matrix diagram
  • identify uses for process decision program charts
  • recognize information presented in a given process decision program chart
  • use a given process decision program chart to manage risks on a project
  • identify uses for activity network diagrams
  • recognize information presented in a given activity network diagram
  • interpret a given activity network diagram


OVERVIEW
In the Define phase of Six Sigma DMAIC, teams identify improvement projects that have the maximum potential for return on time, money, and resource investments. For an accurate assessment of these opportunities, you need to have correct performance metrics and knowledge of where and how to use them. Later, during the Control phase, performance is assessed again using the same metrics to ensure improvements have been achieved. |n This course explores some of these metrics, such as defects per unit, defects per million opportunities, rolled throughput yield, process capability indices, and sigma level. It also explains using cost of poor quality to assess the potential gains to the company if the quality of products and processes is improved. This course is aligned with the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward achieving their certification and becoming productive members of their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.3 hours
OBJECTIVES

Performance Metrics for Six Sigma

  • recognize performance metrics that are based on calculating defects or nonconformities
  • recognize characteristics of two approaches to measuring process performance
  • recognize characteristics of two approaches to measuring process performance
  • calculate defects per unit (DPU)
  • use DPU calculations to plan a project
  • recognize examples of defect opportunities
  • calculate defects per million opportunities (DPMO)
  • use DPMO calculations to plan a project
  • identify the definition of rolled throughput yield (RTY)
  • calculate FTY and RTY
  • use yield calculations to plan a project
  • recognize the level of capability of a given process
  • calculate Cp and Cpk
  • use Cp and Cpk calculations to plan a project
  • identify accurate statements about cost of poor quality (COPQ) and its use as a performance metric for planning Six Sigma projects
  • match types of cost of poor quality (COPQ) to corresponding examples
  • use COPQ as a metric to assist in planning a given Six Sigma project


OVERVIEW
Six Sigma needs both effective leadership and management to deliver its promised results to an organization. Understanding team building processes, tools, and role structures helps Six Sigma team members produce desired results and resolve negative team dynamics. This course will examine Six Sigma team roles and responsibilities, tools for effective team management, and strategies for overcoming challenges. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward achieving their certifications and becoming productive members of their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.6 hours
OBJECTIVES

Six Sigma Project Team Dynamics and Performance

  • identify the types of teams typically used on Six Sigma projects
  • recognize the stages of team evolution
  • recognize concepts related to managing a Six Sigma team
  • identify Six Sigma organizational roles
  • match Six Sigma team roles with corresponding responsibilities
  • recognize Six Sigma project team roles and responsibilities
  • recognize how to solve interpersonal issues on a team, given a scenario
  • recognize the effects of excessive cohesion on a team and ways to overcome the issues
  • recognize strategies for avoiding common problems during team meetings
  • determine the best approach to take given a specific team challenge
  • recognize activities that take place during a brainstorming session
  • evaluate a given brainstorming session and recommend a corrective course of action
  • recognize principles of the nominal group technique
  • evaluate a given NGT session and recommend corrective actions
  • identify situations best suited to different communication tools
  • recognize examples of organizational communication technique
  • use effective communication practices on a Six Sigma project


OVERVIEW
During the Define stage of a Six Sigma project, the Six Sigma team identifies process areas that require analysis and improvement. During the Measure stage, the team maps the processes and procedures that were identified. As this mapping takes place, the team begins to uncover likely causes of the problems and analyze them fully. |n This course will examine key tools and techniques used to model and analyze existing processes. From a process modeling perspective, the course looks at techniques such as process mapping, written procedures, and work instructions. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward achieving their certifications and becoming productive members of their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
0.9 hours
OBJECTIVES

Process Documentation and Analysis in Six Sigma

  • recognize the categories of information obtained through process modeling
  • identify the information to look for when analyzing a process model
  • recognize the role of process modeling in the Measure phase of a Six Sigma project
  • match the process map types to the situations in which they best apply
  • label process map symbols according to their meanings
  • recognize the activities involved in creating a process map
  • interpret a given process map
  • recommend improvements to a process given a process map
  • identify elements of a procedure document
  • recognize characteristics of work instructions
  • recognize how work instructions differ from written procedures


OVERVIEW
To make accurate inferences about populations from sample data, you need to be able to determine the probability that an event or a combination of events will occur. You also need to be familiar with the characteristics of various statistical distributions, and their suitability for different types of data. In this course, you'll be introduced to the concept of probability. You'll learn how to calculate probability involving independent events, mutually exclusive events, multiplication rules, permutations, and combinations. You'll also look at different types of distributions, such as normal, Poisson, binomial, Chi-square, Student's t, and F-distributions. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward achieving their certifications and becoming productive members of their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.7 hours
OBJECTIVES

Basic Probability and Statistical Distributions in Six Sigma

  • match the terms associated with probability to their definitions
  • use the formulas for calculating the probability of simple and mutually exclusive events
  • calculate the probability of given events
  • calculate the probability of given events
  • calculate probability using the addition rule
  • calculate probability using the multiplication rule
  • use addition and multiplication rules to calculate the probability of given events
  • calculate a permutation
  • calculate a combination
  • use formulas to calculate permutations and combinations
  • label examples of variables as continuous or discrete
  • identify characteristics of normal distribution
  • calculate probabilities based on normal distribution
  • use formulas to calculate probability
  • recognize examples of results that you could summarize using a binomial distribution
  • recognize examples of results that you could summarize using a Poisson distribution
  • distinguish between uses of binomial and Poisson distributions
  • recognize characteristics of chi-square distributions
  • identify uses for Student's t-distributions
  • identify characteristics of F-distributions
  • distinguish between Chi-square, Student's t, and F-distributions


OVERVIEW
Before a Six Sigma team can begin to improve an organization's processes, it must measure key performance indicators. In doing so, the team identifies, collects, and analyzes data related to the processes. This course introduces basic types of data, such as continuous and discrete data, as well as various measurement scales. You will learn how to plan data collection and how to use data sampling techniques and data collection tools, such as check sheets. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward achieving their certification and becoming productive members of their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.6 hours
OBJECTIVES

Data Classification, Sampling, and Collection in Six Sigma

  • distinguish between examples of qualitative and quantitative data
  • label examples as either discrete or continuous data
  • determine whether to use discrete or continuous data, given a scenario
  • determine the type of data to gather, given a scenario
  • determine the type of measurement scale being used, given an example
  • demonstrate your understanding about the four levels of measurement
  • identify principles of data sampling
  • match sampling methods with corresponding characteristics
  • identify situations when you would use simple random sampling
  • identify situations when you would use stratified sampling
  • determine the best data sampling method, given a scenario
  • identify characteristics of automated data collection
  • identify data collection best practices
  • recognize characteristics of technologies used for data collection
  • identify key considerations in creating a data collection plan
  • make data collection decisions, given a scenario
  • match types of check sheets with examples of when each type would be used
  • recognize examples of dating coding methods
  • recognize appropriate use of data collection strategies, given a scenario


OVERVIEW
Basic graphs and tables can be used to summarize and assess performance-related data in a meaningful way. Six Sigma practitioners use descriptive statistics to tabulate and graphically represent sample data through a number of informative charts and diagrams. Using analytical statistics, inferences are made about the larger population based on their sample data. These tools allow the organization to view its performance graphically and draw valid conclusions about its processes and products. This course provides basic statistical tools for describing, presenting, and analyzing data. It explores the process of preparing and presenting sample data using graphical methods and then making valid inferences about the population represented by the sample. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward their certification and to become productive members on their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; also quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.0 hours
OBJECTIVES

Statistics and Graphical Presentation in Six Sigma

  • distinguish between the characteristics of descriptive and inferential statistics
  • recognize the implications of the central limit theorem for inferential statistics
  • match tools for inferential statistics to descriptions of their use
  • demonstrate your understanding of concepts related to inferential statistics
  • calculate measures of central tendency
  • calculate measures of dispersion
  • use measures of central tendency and dispersion, given a scenario
  • interpret a given frequency distribution table
  • calculate cumulative frequency distribution, given a dataset
  • calculate and use frequency distribution information on a Six Sigma project
  • match scatter diagrams with corresponding interpretations
  • interpret a given probability plot
  • recognize attributes of a process given a histogram
  • interpret a given stem-and-leaf plot
  • interpret a given box-and-whisker plot
  • interpret given graphical presentations


OVERVIEW
The adequacy and accuracy of measurement systems is vital to the success of any data collection and analysis, and therefore critical to the overall success of any Six Sigma initiatives in an organization. Measurement systems encompass devices, procedures, and the human element of measurement, which together must produce correct measurements and comply with appropriate standards. This course examines how to analyze a measurement system to help it produce correct measurements and minimize its proportion of variability in the overall process variability. It introduces key elements of measurement system capability using gauge repeatability and reproducibility (GR&R) studies, measurement correlation, bias, linearity, percent agreement, and precision to tolerance (P/T) ratio. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward their certification and become productive members on their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; and process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.5 hours
OBJECTIVES

Measurement System Analysis in Six Sigma

  • distinguish between accuracy and precision
  • identify types of correlation
  • demonstrate your understanding of concepts related to measurement system analysis
  • match types of variation with corresponding characteristics
  • calculate the gauge repeatability and reproducibility value for a given set of data
  • interpret data from a given gauge repeatability and reproducibility study
  • calculate a precision to tolerance ratio
  • conduct a gauge repeatability and reproducibility study and calculate the P/T ratio, given a scenario
  • identify best practices in conducting a bias study
  • calculate and interpret bias, in a given scenario
  • conduct a bias study
  • identify attributes of linearity
  • calculate linearity and interpret a linearity plot
  • conduct a linearity study
  • recognize situations when you would use percent agreement to assess a measurement system
  • interpret numeric output from a given percent agreement analysis
  • recommend changes to a measurement system based on percent agreement findings


OVERVIEW
Organizations should regularly evaluate existing processes to make sure they meet targets and specifications set by their customer and business requirements. Measuring and analyzing process capability and performance enables an organization to report its sigma level and improvement teams to targets their efforts effectively. |n This course explores the key concepts related to process capability and performance, and the methods of measuring and interpreting common performance indices. It also discusses how to verify the stability and normality of a given process and identify key considerations for measuring process capability, such as short-term and long-term capability and sigma shift.This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward their certification and become productive members on their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; also quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.5 hours
OBJECTIVES

Process and Performance Capability Measurement in Six Sigma

  • distinguish between process limits and specification limits
  • categorize examples of performance metrics
  • demonstrate your understanding of concepts related to process performance and capability
  • sequence the steps of a process capability study
  • determine the stability of a process using a control chart
  • identify methods of verifying normality for a given process
  • determine the stability and normality of a given process
  • calculate the Cp of a given process
  • calculate the Cpk of a given process
  • rate the capability of a process based on Cp and Cpk values
  • calculate the Pp of a given process
  • calculate the Ppk of a given process
  • identify the characteristics of the Cpm index and when it's used
  • assess the capability and performance of a given process
  • interpret the capability and performance index results in a process capability study
  • recommend action to improve a process in a given scenario
  • estimate the long-term capability of a given process
  • assess a given process using capability and performance indices


OVERVIEW
In the Analyze stage of the Six Sigma DMAIC process, project teams carefully analyze process output and input variables. The goal of this analysis is to narrow down the many possible inputs identified during the Measure stage. The analysis is carried out using tools that help identify a few probable root causes that are impacting process performance. |n This course introduces some key tools used for exploratory data analysis in Six Sigma, such as multi-vari studies, correlation analysis, and regression models. It also explains the correlation coefficient and its statistical significance. In addition, the course helps you interpret the linear regression equation, understand the steps in hypothesis testing for regression statistics and explore the use of a regression model for prediction and estimation of outcomes. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward achieving their certifications and becoming productive members of their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.5 hours
OBJECTIVES

Multi-vari Studies, Correlation, and Linear Regression in Six Sigma

  • identify characteristics of a multi-vari analysis
  • identify guidelines for creating sampling plans
  • recognize actions involved in carrying out a multi-vari analysis
  • match variation types with corresponding characteristics
  • interpret given variation results
  • use variation results to determine the focus of a multi-vari study
  • identify uses of correlation analysis in Six Sigma
  • make inferences about data based on a given scatter diagram
  • recognize considerations for interpreting the correlation coefficient
  • determine the relationship between variables given scatter diagrams
  • identify characteristics of causation
  • identify reasons why Six Sigma teams should determine the statistical significance of a correlation coefficient
  • recognize the significance of determining causation and p-value for a set of variables
  • recognize how linear regression is used during data analysis
  • sequence the steps for hypothesis testing for regression statistics
  • calculate the t-statistic
  • calculate an outcome using the simple least-squares linear regression formula
  • use the p-value method to validate a hypothesis test for a given regression equation


OVERVIEW
During the Analyze phase of a Six Sigma improvement project, the team conducts a number of statistical analyses to determine the nature of variables and their interrelationships in the process under study. Team members typically collect samples of the population data to be analyzed, and based on that sample data, they make hypotheses about the entire population. Because there is a lot at stake in forming the correct conclusions about the larger population, Six Sigma teams validate their inferences using hypothesis tests. This course introduces basic hypothesis testing concepts, terminologies, and some of the most commonly used hypothesis tests – one- and two-sample tests for means. The course also discusses the importance of sample size and power in hypothesis testing, as well as exploring issues relating to point estimators and confidence intervals in hypothesis testing. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward their certification and to become productive members on their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.9 hours
OBJECTIVES

Introduction to Hypothesis Testing and Tests for Means in Six Sigma

  • identify the purpose of hypothesis testing
  • match elements of a hypothesis test with corresponding descriptions
  • identify best practices when establishing the practical significance of hypothesis testing results
  • demonstrate your understanding of basic concepts related to hypothesis testing
  • recognize how confidence intervals are used in hypothesis testing
  • recognize the attributes of Type I and Type II errors
  • classify estimates and error types
  • identify factors that affect the power of a hypothesis test
  • determine sample size for a given alpha risk level using margin of error formula
  • determine the power and appropriate sample size for a given hypothesis test
  • sequence the steps in the hypothesis testing process
  • match examples of alternative hypotheses with their corresponding probability distribution graphs
  • determine whether to reject a null hypothesis based on given critical values and p-values
  • use steps in the hypothesis testing process
  • perform a one-sample hypothesis test for mean, given a scenario
  • carry out one-sample hypothesis tests for means
  • test a hypothesis using a two-sample test for means (pooled)
  • carry out a two-sample hypothesis test for means
  • test a hypothesis using a two-sample test for means (non-pooled)
  • carry out a two-sample hypothesis test for means


OVERVIEW
As a Six Sigma project moves into the Analyze phase, team members identify possible sources of variation, underlying root causes, and areas for improvement. It is here where assumptions or hypotheses about a process, product, or service are made and validated using tests based on sample data. This course will familiarize you with some of the advanced hypothesis tests used in Six Sigma, such as test for proportions, variances, and analysis of variance (ANOVA). You will learn how to use Paired-comparison t-test and chi-square tests for validating hypotheses. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward achieving their certifications and becoming productive members of their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.9 hours
OBJECTIVES

Hypothesis Tests for Variances and Proportions in Six Sigma

  • identify types of hypothesis tests
  • distinguish between examples of paired-comparison and two-sample t-tests
  • interpret the results of a given paired-comparison t-test using the critical value method
  • interpret the results of a given paired-comparison t-test using the p-value method
  • determine whether to accept a null hypothesis based on given paired-comparison t-test results
  • conduct a one-sample test for variance, given a scenario
  • conduct a one-sample test for variance
  • conduct a two-sample test for variance, given a scenario
  • conduct a two-sample test for variance
  • recognize the required sample size for a test for proportions, given the hypothesized proportion
  • conduct a one-sample test for proportion, given a scenario
  • conduct a two-sample test for proportion, given a scenario
  • conduct one- and two-sample tests for variance
  • match ANOVA concepts to their corresponding definitions
  • conduct a one-way ANOVA test, given a scenario
  • conduct a one-way ANOVA test for means
  • recognize valid parameters and interpretations related to chi-square tests
  • use a given contingency table to perform a chi-square test
  • conduct a chi-square test, given a scenario


OVERVIEW
In the Improve stage of Six Sigma DMAIC, Six Sigma teams design and conduct experiments to investigate the relationships between input variables and response variables. By controlling and changing the input variables and observing the effects on the response variables, a Six Sigma team gains a deep understanding of their relationships. After determining what and how much needs to be changed to gain the desired improvement, teams generate solution ideas. |n This course surveys the concepts that are fundamental to the Design of Experiments methodology, including the basic elements of experiments: variables, factors and levels, responses, treatments, errors, repetition, blocks, randomization, effects, and replication. It also introduces and analyzes main effects, interaction effects, and their plots. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward their certification and to become productive members on their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; and process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.4 hours
OBJECTIVES

Design of Experiments in Six Sigma

  • recognize the benefits of Design of Experiments
  • match key DOE elements with examples
  • sequence the steps in the DOE process
  • recognize concepts related to using the Design of Experiments methodology
  • recognize examples of types of experimental error
  • determine whether a given experiment design is balanced
  • identify the benefits of randomization
  • recognize factors that should be blocked in a given scenario
  • distinguish between reasons for using replication and repetition
  • recognize the implications of choosing full and fractional factorial designs
  • use principles and techniques of DOE
  • recognize the principles for interpreting main effects plots
  • recognize which terms should be included in the model, based on results from a full factorial experiment
  • use principles and techniques of DOE


OVERVIEW
Getting to the source of why something has gone wrong in a system or process is critical to identifying the changes necessary for resolving the problem. During the Improve phase of a Six Sigma project, team members use a variety of nonstatistical methods and Lean tools to analyze systems and processes, looking for ways to reduce costs and eliminate waste. These tools help identify root causes and possible solutions. This course explores how to use various tools for conducting root cause analysis and reducing waste, such as fishbone diagrams, relational matrices, the 5 Whys, fault tree analysis, the 5Ss, standard work, and kanban-pull. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward achieving their certification and becoming productive members of their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.5 hours
OBJECTIVES

Root Cause Analysis and Waste Elimination in Six Sigma

  • recognize the general process for carrying out a root cause analysis
  • recognize how fishbone diagrams are used in root cause analysis
  • use a relational matrix to prioritize the root causes of a given problem
  • identify errors made by a team conducting a 5 Whys analysis, in a given scenario
  • interpret a given fault tree analysis diagram
  • use tools to conduct root cause analyses
  • classify activities as value-add or nonvalue-add
  • recommend strategies for eliminating waste in a work setting, given a scenario
  • recognize how to add value and reduce waste in a process
  • identify the terms that belong to the 5S tool
  • match 5S principles to examples
  • match types of poka-yoke to corresponding examples
  • match elements of the standard work process to their corresponding purposes
  • recognize characteristics of a kanban-pull system
  • sequence examples of the four basic steps in kanban-pull, given a scenario
  • recognize how to reduce waste in a process


OVERVIEW
During the Improve stage of a project, the Six Sigma team uses tools to address the causes of problems in the process. Cycle time reduction and continuous improvement tools are popular choices to address many of these problems. Reducing cycle time brings products to the market faster and improves delivery time and overall customer satisfaction. A timely and productive application of kaizen - or continuous improvement - allows an organization to eliminate waste, streamline processes, reduce costs, and create a Lean culture in the organization. |n This course looks at some of the common lean tools for cycle time reduction and continuous improvement, including continuous flow, setup reduction, kaizen, and kaizen blitz. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward their certification and to become productive members on their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; also quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.3 hours
OBJECTIVES

Cycle Time Reduction and Kaizen in Six Sigma

  • calculate cycle time and takt time, given a scenario
  • recognize the benefits of cycle time reduction
  • demonstrate your understanding of cycle time reduction concepts
  • identify characteristics of the continuous flow approach to cycle time reduction
  • recognize the characteristics of the single-minute exchange of dies (SMED) method
  • sequence the core steps of the single-minute exchange of dies (SMED) method
  • demonstrate your understanding of cycle time reduction concepts
  • determine the appropriate type of kaizen event for a given project
  • recognize examples of activities typically performed during each day of a kaizen blitz
  • recognize activities a team carries out while implementing kaizen in an organization
  • use the kaizen process to implement a kaizen event


OVERVIEW
Ensuring a process is in control and it's behaving in the manner it was intended to is critical to any Six Sigma improvement initiative. In the Control phase of a Six Sigma DMAIC project, teams need to control the improved processes in order to sustain continuous gains. Process control involves applying tools to monitor and maintain each improved process, and to prevent it from reverting to its previous state. By applying statistical process control, you can identify out of control processes, reasons for noncompliance, and take actions to address the situation. |n This course introduces basic concepts in the statistical process control methodology, including the selection of variables and rational subgrouping. It looks at the key elements of a control plan and explores the steps for developing an effective plan. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward their certification and to become productive members of their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.8 hours
OBJECTIVES

Statistical Process Control and Control Plans in Six Sigma

  • recognize the characteristics of an in-control process
  • identify objectives of statistical process control
  • recognize characteristics of statistical process control
  • demonstrate your understanding of concepts related to statistical process control
  • match the key elements of a control chart with corresponding descriptions
  • match types of control charts to their corresponding descriptions
  • classify examples of causes of variations as either common or special causes
  • distinguish between types of control charts and variation causes
  • identify criteria for choosing variables to study
  • recognize examples of variables that are good candidates for statistical process control
  • select variables for a statistical process control study
  • identify properties of rational subgroups
  • select the best option for rational subgrouping, in a given scenario
  • identify considerations for determining appropriate subgroup size
  • recognize principles of rational subgrouping
  • identify characteristics of a control plan
  • recognize examples of information typically included in a control plan
  • identify actions involved in transferring responsibility for process control from the Six Sigma team to the process owner
  • recognize how to create and transfer responsibility for a control plan


OVERVIEW
Having analyzed and improved your processes to the desired level in a Six Sigma DMAIC project, you need to monitor and control them over an extended period of time. SPC tools such as control charts are used to determine if the process is stable. This course teaches methods for identifying, selecting, creating, and interpreting control charts for variables and attributes data. The course also explains how you can recognize when a process has become unstable and is out of control. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward achieving their certification and becoming productive members of their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
2.2 hours
OBJECTIVES

Creating and Using Control Charts in Six Sigma

  • recognize basic concepts related to control charts
  • determine the type of control chart to use in a given situation
  • determine the appropriate type of control chart to use
  • match decision rules with descriptions of how their data patterns appear on a control chart
  • identify appropriate corrective actions for the trend exhibited in a given control chart
  • use decision rules to identify processes that are out of control and apply appropriate corrective action
  • match steps in the control charting process with corresponding activities
  • recognize the steps for creating and using a control chart
  • distinguish between when to use an Xbar-R, Xbar-s, or median control chart
  • determine any special cause variation in data by creating and analyzing an Xbar-R chart
  • recognize which formulas to use to help determine special cause variation in an Xbar-s control chart
  • determine any special cause variation in data by creating and interpreting an ImR chart
  • create and use variables data control charts
  • calculate the center line, UCL, and LCL for a p control chart to determine if special cause variation exists
  • calculate the center line, UCL, and LCL for an np control chart to determine if special cause variation exists
  • calculate the center line, UCL, and LCL for a u control chart to determine if special cause variation exists
  • calculate the center line, UCL, and LCL for a c control chart to determine if special cause variation exists
  • create and use attributes data control charts


OVERVIEW
In the final stages of a Six Sigma project, teams need to control the improved process in order to sustain the improvements. Process control involves applying tools to continuously monitor and maintain each improved process, and to prevent it from reverting to its previous state. Two tools from the Lean toolset specifically help here. Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) is a proactive equipment maintenance program that seeks to engage employees at all levels and functions in an organization to maximize the overall effectiveness of existing processes and equipment. The Visual Workplace is a Lean tool that uses visuals such as signs, labels, and color-coded markings to prevent workers from wasting time and effort searching for materials. |n This course explores how TPM can be used to control the improved process and maintain process gains. It also presents the elements of a visual factory and describes how the visual factory provides at-a-glance information about process status, targets, and performance. This course is aligned to the ASQ Body of Knowledge and is designed to assist Green Belt candidates toward their certification and to become productive members on their Six Sigma project teams.
TARGET AUDIENCE
Candidates seeking Six Sigma Green Belt certification; quality professionals, engineers, production managers, and frontline supervisors; and process owners and champions charged with the responsibility of improving quality and processes at the organizational or departmental level
DURATION
1.2 hours
OBJECTIVES

Lean Tools for Process Control in Six Sigma

  • recognize features of Total Productive Maintenance (TPM)
  • identify characteristics of an organization that has implemented TPM's principle of shared responsibility
  • recognize the goals of Total Productive Maintenance (TPM)
  • recognize key concepts related to Total Productive Management (TPM)
  • classify examples of visual cues as visual controls, visual displays, or both
  • recognize examples of common jidoka devices
  • recognize examples of tools that keep employees in direct contact with the workplace
  • recognize examples of tools that clarify targets for improvement
  • determine which tools to use in a visual factory
  • recognize examples of ways Total Productive Maintenance is used in the service industry
  • recognize examples of a visual workplace
  • recognize how control tools are used in the service industry


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